Posts Tagged ‘Obamacare’

Reflecting On My President – MLK Day 2017

January 16, 2017
dsc_0086

A new arrival at the National Portrait Gallery in 2008

As I watch 60 Minutes and their interviews with President Obama I realize how I admire his thoughtful tone and quick wit. I’m going to miss him. He is the president of my children’s adulthood and I have found him to be both pragmatic and diplomatic. I admit I am at a loss for the vitriol thrown at him. I wish he had done more, but I still am proud of what he did accomplish against the constant tide of false accusations and roadblocks. What accomplishments I hear my naysayer friends demand. I can explain.

Let me set the stage leading up to this man’s presidency – not the two wars and the crashing economy – I want to get more personal. My family had been denied health insurance coverage due to pre-existing conditions when I changed jobs and our family planning decisions were altered because of the religious affiliation of my wife’s workplace – their conditions for insurance. My previous employer was being taken over by a corporation from Singapore and was being shut down. We had grown at a time of housing loans granted at 120% of a property’s value so customers were installing very profitable for us home entertainment systems based on the idea their home value would always go up, but that bubble had burst. I was losing my job and my 401k was in the toilet.

For me then it is easy to find this administration’s success – My 401k is back better than ever, I am employed in a new career after going to school using the extended benefits for retraining and gaining experience under the Obama stimulus package. My children were able to be insured under our family plan until age 26 under the ACA, and now, if we need to change jobs, we still get coverage. No longer are career choices being held hostage to a workplace whose insurance covered us before those “pre-existing” conditions show up. My children are able to follow their own paths – my son works for a biotech company and my daughter is in nursing school – free of that burdan. I couldn’t be prouder.

But my admiration for the Obamas goes deeper than that. My nephew, Kelley, worked on his campaign and, later, worked in the White House Office of Correspondence. Through him I heard the stories of the First Family, sitting Sasha and Malia, helping with the White House Easter egg roll. One of the most amazing things he showed me was where he worked – not in the White House proper, but in rented office space a few blocks away.

Into this space poured millions (literally) of pieces of mail that had to be read, sorted, and catalogued. Some letters had serious concerns about healthcare or the economy, others, less serious, like second graders learning how to address an envelope and a letter to the president in one lesson. All received the same treatment coming in, but a few were selected each week to move on to the desk of the president. Those letters were chosen to give an overall sense of what was motivating people to write, be it good or bad, and a few picked because they had problems the President could solve. Mr. Obama would hand write replies to these regular Americans who took time to write to their president.

Through my nephew I was able to visit the White House a couple of times (and even got smooched by Bo!) and toured the West Wing. On display in the halls was student artwork and photographs of various events across the country. They were changed often to remind those occupying the offices in that wing who they really worked for.

dsc_0050

Kelley was able to get my wife and I on the lawn for a Marine One take-off. He told me I needed a suit coat and tie as a guest of a White House staffer. We raced around DC that morning trying to find a place open to buy the requisite outfit and when we arrived we were ushered onto the lawn and lined up. Then, from around the side, came forty or fifty folks in tee shirts and shorts randomly selected from the tourists taking pictures of the White House. They were lined up in front of us. Kelley told me that we had to stand behind the tourists because the staff were all instructed to be sure they never used their positions to advantage themselves above the people they were there to serve.

This all happened during a time when I visited D.C. often. The school I worked for sponsored an 8th grade trip to Washington and my son was living there, working for companies that contracted to the State and Defense departments. When I was chaperoning the school trips Kelley would come to meet our middle school group on the blocked street behind the White House. He would bring an auto-pen signed picture of the First Couple for the school and answer questions for the kids. He did this on his own time. I would introduce him to my students with great pride explaining that here was a kid only a few years older than they were (from my perspective), from a family not much different than theirs, who was now working in the most powerful office in the world. The kids were more intrigued with his two cell phones (one a White House issue Blackberry and the other a personal iPhone) and stack of ID badges.

When Kelley left to take a job with the EPA he was granted an exit interview with his boss. Kelley arranged for his mom and dad to be there while the President of the United States shook his hand and thanked him for his service there in the Oval Office. Mr. Obama took time to chat with everyone and made sure pictures were taken (you can’t bring your own camera). My brother said he almost cried. You can almost see that in the picture.

12418002_10103568170275055_8335533710762312815_n

And that’s the thing with this president – it really isn’t ever about him – it’s about the office. Mr Obama came to up to be at the graduation of Worcester Voc and to bring attention to a school program he felt was exemplary. He didn’t just make his speech and have his photograph taken, he stayed, passed out diplomas and shook the hand or hugged every graduate of that very large class with as much enthusiasm for the last as the first. He made it their graduation.

And that is his accomplishment. He kept the Office of the President accessible to all the people. As other world leaders were vying for his attention many everyday concerns were brought to him  and he found a way to answer both. He was often harshly criticized and sometimes deservedly so, but he always listened. Reading the hurtful, ignorant, racist remarks directed at him, his wife and his family in comment sections of newspapers and social media and his not using the nuclear option makes him a far better person than me. Today, I know Mr Obama’s presidency was not about the color of his skin, but about the content of his character. He stayed above the ugliness beneath him for the dignity of the office and, for that, he will always be my president.

dsc_0059

 

Advertisements

Can We Talk?

July 25, 2012

image from KDVR

If this were only a joke. A man walks into a movie theater – armed with an AR-15 rifle, a shotgun and handguns and his home was booby-trapped with a trip wire, explosives and unknown liquids that took a day to disarm and I’m called partisan and disingenuous when I say it is pure evil and we should look into how he was able to come by this cache with the thought of preventing the unthinkable in the future.

The horror of the shootings in Aurora is obvious yet so many talking heads and op-ed writers want us to stay focused only on the individual stories of heroism, cowardice and how the families and friends will be changed. Mention that the event puts into focus difficult issues for America and you get shot down for “politicizing” the calamity. Why is it wrong to discuss the consequences of a tragedy?

I am told now is not time for that conversation. We need to respect the victims’ families and let them mourn in peace. An online friend mentioned a story he read about the potential bankruptcy faced by one of the victims who is uninsured and can’t pay the medical bills. He commented that one injustice was being compounded by another. He was pounced upon for “pushing his liberal agenda.” I can’t help thinking that part of this insanity is not only the shooting, but the price many of these victims will be paying in an emotional and financial aftermath. Shouldn’t we mitigate their pain by making it clear that we, all Americans, will help them with the costs of the medical care? Luckily some have started a fund for this, but not everyone is a Blanche DuBois who can depend on the kindness of strangers.

Why shouldn’t we look at the rules that allowed the legal purchase of these weapons? Rules are important. The Ten Commandments wouldn’t be necessary if folks didn’t kill, covet or take the Lord’s name in vain. No one needs rules or laws until someone is hurt. Every business I’ve been involved with only wrote new policies in the wake of some unforeseen stupidity or situation and it is our outrage that gives us the energy to focus. So when a shooting occurs in a movie theater, school or strip mall and the conversation turns to preventing or minimizing the losses the energy is high and the answer is obvious. We need new rules (or enforcement of existing ones) to prevent certain weapons from getting into the hands of certain people. No one disputes this, not even the NRA. The devil is in the details; the debate is what weapons and which people. This, however, is the fearful slippery slope for the NRA, so we are told to respect the families and let them mourn. Meanwhile our resolve dissipates.

Too bad. If we were to have that conversation and acted with resolve we might reduce or prevent the next Aurora, Columbine or Virginia Tech massacre. The downside might be the headache for the NRA, but no worries – that preexisting condition must be covered under the Affordable Care Act in 2014. There I go again – “politicizing.”